Blog Archives

Your Client is Hacked and Personal Information is Leaked Online – Now What?

By Hayes Hunt and Jillian Thornton You are general counsel to a company, and your CEO steps into your office, clutching his iPhone in one hand and wiping sweat from his brow with the other, and tells you that a

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Posted in Corporate Compliance, Criminal Law, Litigation, Litigation Practice, Prosecution & Defense, Social Media & Law, The Client, The Practice of Law, Uncategorized

Lawyer’s Duty to Preserve Social Media Evidence

By Hayes Hunt and Jeffrey Monhait Lawyers must take “appropriate” steps to preserve their clients’ potentially relevant and discoverable social media evidence. That is the key take-away from an ethics opinion recently issued by the Philadelphia Bar Association. However, lawyers

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Posted in Social Media & Law

Twitter, Evidence, Privacy and Social Media

By Hayes Hunt and Brian Kint A recent case, albeit one dealing with a governmental subpoena, shows that the SCA may not be the panacea that social networking sites think it is. In People v. Harris, Twitter sought to quash

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Posted in Criminal Law

Facebook Subpoena – Trial Evidence

By Hayes Hunt and Brian Kint Obtaining information through a subpoena may be easier said than done. Third-party subpoenas to social networking sites are likely to result in an objection on the grounds that the production of private information would

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Posted in Trial

Social Media Evidence – Authentication

By Hayes Hunt and Brian Kint Despite the relative freedom law enforcement officials have to gather evidence, prosecutors and defense counsel alike are limited as to what information they can introduce into evidence at trial. Perhaps the biggest hurdle attorneys

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Posted in Trial

Prosecution’s Use of Social Media Research

By Hayes Hunt and Brian Kint All of this goes to show that the use of social media in judicial proceedings is not a one way street. Law enforcement and prosecutors are increasingly utilizing social networking sites to build their

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Posted in Social Media & Law

Juror Misconduct and Social Media

By Hayes Hunt and Brian Kint The Daugerdas case also shows the importance of continuing juror investigation beyond voir dire. Monitoring jurors’ social networking sites during trial and deliberations can reveal instances of juror misconduct as well. As social networking

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Posted in Trial

Trial and Social Media: Researching Potential Jurors

By Hayes Hunt and Brian Kint Social media is a mainstay in daily life. Over a billion people are registered users of Facebook. The Facebook logo and the logos of other social networking giants such as Twitter are quickly becoming

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Posted in Trial

Blogger Beware – Lawyer Blogs: Free Speech and Advertising

By Hayes Hunt and Brian Kint Lawyers and law firms are increasingly using blogs, also referred to as “blawgs” along with social media sites such as Facebook and Twitter, to build their visibility and brand.  While blogs do not have

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Posted in Ethics & Professional Conduct

Fired for “Liking” – Social Media Use at Your Job

By Hayes Hunt and Jillian Thornton Giving your opinion on politics or complaining about the boss to your friends via Facebook is so commonplace and rampant that few people probably stop to think about the consequences of their posting. Less

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Posted in Social Media & Law
About the Editor
Hayes Hunt concentrates his practice in the representation of individuals, corporations and executives in a wide variety of federal and state criminal law and regulatory enforcement matters as well as complex civil litigation. Hayes is a partner in the firm's Commercial Litigation Department as well as its Criminal Defense and Governmental Investigations Group.
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